Six Bomb Boards Feature: Bryce Oquaye

Throughout April Octane is celebrating the 10th anniversary of Kentucky’s elite group of comic art creators, the SIX BOMB BOARDS. Get to know them and celebrate with them on Avengers Day at the SIX BOMB BOARDS LIVEART CON AT MOVIE TAVERN APRIL 27, 2019 FROM NOON TO 8PM.


Your name: 
Bryce Oquaye

Where do you live: 
I’m originally from Queens, NY but I also went to high school in Richmond, KY

Your current / past project(s):
Some comics I worked on are Herman has Superpowers for the Webcomic Factory, BRAWL! which I self published, Wardens Watch, and I have a upcoming comic for the summer called Kaiju Killer Dante

I’ve worked on Marvel cards for Upper Deck and I’ve done design work for companies like ZOX.

Website for readers to find out more about you:
Instagram:@bmad100s
Twitter: @mrmad100s
Website: bryceoquayeart.com

When did you first decide that you wanted to create your own comics as a career?

Pretty young actually. I remember reading Spiderman and Appleseed as a kid and thinking that I wanted to tell stories too. I don’t think I actually took the steps to really learning how to do it until I was a bit older, but I always had the goal in mind.

Who has had the biggest influence on you outside the comics industry, and how did they affect your life?

I think the biggest influence on me is my mother. She worked really hard and showed me what hustle can do for a person that refuses to quit. I can’t say that I’ve seen anyone work the way she does. That’s why I don’t mind to lose sleep!

Who has had the biggest influence on your comics career, and how has that person changed your work?

Wow, this is a tough one! I’d say my biggest influences as an illustrator have been Lesean Thomas (Boondocks, Cannonbusters) and cats like Joe Mad and Damian Scott. Lesean Thomas’s journey has been really dope to see over the years. I’ve always leaned towards more stylized and animation inspired work, so seeing cats like them beast out inspires me to go nuts!

What do you do to recharge your creative batteries?

Read new comics, check out new and some of my favorite artists, play video games, and run around with my kids. They always have the best stories to tell!

Describe your typical work routine.

I have to have music! I queue up my playlists and start to sketch random whatevers for a while. Then, I usually pick a task and start to zoom in on that. I like to start with more conceptual things like storyboards and designs and then I move on to doing more finished work and line art after I’ve warmed up. In the end, I usually eat some snacks and celebrate my artistic victory by Milly Rockin over my drafting table.

What tools do you use to create comics and what makes them the “right tools” for you?

I used to work only digitally, but then when I became more comfortable as an artist I started to lean into more traditional work. Now, I have a mix of both depending on the gig. Digitally I use Clip Studio Paint and Photoshop for cleaning line art and coloring. I like to do my line art traditionally.

What element of your work gives you the most personal satisfaction?

When I can look at the finished product and see where all the time went!

What has been the most rewarding project in your professional career – in or out of comics – and why?

When I finished the mural for Atomic Ramen. The responses and reactions to it made me really proud. It really pushed me forward as a creator.

We’ve seen very talented newcomers who are trying to get their first professional projects. What’s the best advice you’ve ever heard given to a promising new creator?

Keep doing what you do. Make what you want and do it however you want to. Your audience will find you.

– Justin Stewart. Six Bomb Boards Founder / Comic Artist

Let’s get deep: What’s the most important “big idea” that you’ve learned in life – in or out of comics – and why is it important?

That no one can box you in or keep you from doing anything you want to accomplish. I’ve heard a lot of people tell me over the years that what I do or aspire towards wasn’t for me. It’s because there weren’t many people that looked like myself in the conversations, and that’s both creatively and in the materials themselves.

Over time I learned that no one can tell me what I can’t do. If you push forward through whatever difficulties come up, you can do what you want.

Don’t quit when things get difficult and learn from your mistakes, but NEVER let anyone or anything dictate what you want to do.

Six Bomb Boards Feature: Will Hensley

Throughout April Octane is celebrating the 10th anniversary of Kentucky’s elite group of comic art creators, the SIX BOMB BOARDS. Get to know them and celebrate with them on Avengers Day at the SIX BOMB BOARDS LIVEART CON AT MOVIE TAVERN APRIL 27, 2019 FROM NOON TO 8PM.


Your name: Will Hensley

Your published credits:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q7NbMiQ6gNo&t=2s

Where do you live:
Lexington, KY

Your current project(s):
I’ve got a couple of ideas brewing but nothing is quite announcement ready yet. Stay tuned though, I’m 99.9% certain there’s another Will project involving robots, monsters and possibly sentient food heading down the creativity pipe.

Website for readers to find out more about you:
Instagram: @willhnsy

When did you first decide that you wanted to create your own comics as a career?

Well, It’s not something I really decided to have a career in, as much as it is a hobby I dabble in. As far as WHEN I decided to dabble, it dates back to about 2007ish when I would make very very simple one page comics using only mechanical pencil and SUPER rough sketches. They were really dumb and fun, but and I always had fun making them.

Who has had the biggest influence on you outside the comics industry, and how did they affect your life?

I suppose my biggest influence outside of comics would be my buddy Josh. He’s constantly pushing me to do better and is always teaching me new tips and tricks to improve my artwork. Whether he realizes it or not he often gives pretty great sage-like advice too.

Who has had the biggest influence on your comics career, and how has that person changed your work?

I don’t know that I have just ONE biggest influence, but rather a myriad of creators and artists I often strive to imitate and reference in my personal work as often as possible. Here’s a shortlist though for those who are curious: Matt Groening, Osamu Tezuka, Ralph Bakshi, Jhonen Vasquez, and Ray Harryhausen. All of them have influenced my drawing style or even just the way I view things from a creative standpoint in some capacity.

What do you do to recharge your creative batteries?

I like to re-watch or re-read something I really love in order to get ideas or even just analyze what it is that I love about it and see if I can plug that into my own work at all.

Describe your typical work routine.

My typical “art time” setup involves playing podcasts over a bluetooth speaker and making sure I have a Batman mug full of something caffeinated. Then I’ll make a pile of all the pens and markers I plan to use on a little side table next to my drafting table. Usually I’ll have a sheet of paper or a big piece of mat board or whatever all ready to go.

Once I have all of that stuff one of 2 things happens: I either mess around and make a bunch of nonsense doodles to work myself up to a serious project or I’ll just jump right in and get cracking on whatever the project at hand happens to be.

What tools do you use to create comics and what makes them the “right tools” for you?

I’m an analog guy all the way, I use bristol board, pentels, microns, a 2H pencil and various types of markers. I’ve always enjoyed the hand drawn / rough look of artwork and older comics. For whatever reason I happen to like working in this way and find that it suits my art style.

What element of your work gives you the most personal satisfaction?

The finished product, or rather what I end up referring to as the finished product gives me so much satisfaction. There’s nothing better to me than the feeling of an art session that I know was not only productive, but also provides me with this thing I made that I can be proud of and show off if I feel inclined to.

In fact there are even times where I can’t help but share the things I make that make me laugh as well because of how strange I made certain characters look.

What has been the most rewarding project in your professional career – in or out of comics – and why?

My most rewarding project was easily my aforementioned student film I made back in 2012. That was my first taste at working with a team and overseeing the execution of a vision I had, and somehow bringing it all together and making something kind of entertaining. It made all the stress, long nights, and hustle of that project so worth it!

We’ve seen very talented newcomers who are trying to get their first professional projects. What’s the best advice you’ve ever heard given to a promising new creator?

One time I was at a Bruce Campbell book signing with a friend and when my friend went up to meet him, he told him he was an aspiring filmmaker. Bruce Campbell’s advice to him was very simple: “Don’t suck.”

Let’s get deep: What’s the most important “big idea” that you’ve learned in life – in or out of comics – and why is it important?

Ooh, that’s a tough question, but I’ll do my best here. Probably the most important high concept life idea I’ve learned, kinda goes back to my previous answer (the “don’t suck” answer, remember?). That big idea is the fact that more often than not rejection is a big part of any sort of pitch you could potentially make to a big publisher or studio depending on which medium you’re shooting for. Always keep grinding, always keep up the hustle and never ever give up on your dreams, no matter how often you hear the word No.

SIX BOMB BOARDS: Jae Johannsson

Throughout April Octane is celebrating the 10th anniversary of Kentucky’s elite group of comic art creators, the SIX BOMB BOARDS. Get to know them and celebrate with them on Avengers Day at the SIX BOMB BOARDS LIVEART CON AT MOVIE TAVERN APRIL 27, 2019 FROM NOON TO 8PM.


Your name:
Jae Johannsson

Your published credits:
None (YET!!!)

Where do you live:
Lexington

Your current project(s) that we should mention:
I’m making mermaids for a show at Limbo Bar in Louisville. Its for Mer-May. Haaaaa

Website for readers to find out more about you:
Instagram: @starfall_art
Facebook: @starfallart
Etsy: Etsy.com/shop/starfallart

When did you first decide that you wanted to create your own comics as a career?

I wish I made comics. As it is, I am working towards getting my nursing degree, with the hopes of getting into medical illustration!

Who has had the biggest influence on you outside the comics industry, and how did they affect your life?

My biggest influence would have to be my therapist. Is it weird to put therapist? My past was not so great, and she helped me through some really dark times, as in I wouldn’t be here without her interventions. She was the one who pushed me into art to help process my trauma.  She gave me the tools I needed to become who I am today. There is no shame in my mental health game. ( And no shame in anyone else’s! Do what you must, get the help you need if you need it!)

Who has had the biggest influence on your comics career, and how has that person changed your work?

Freaking Joshua Penrose and Justin motherfucking Stewart. Josh introduced me to all these amazing creatives I’m lucky enough to call friends now, and Justin, well this guy has been dropping great hints about things to think about in my art. Without these two dudes, my art wouldn’t be what it is now.

What do you do to recharge your creative batteries?

I like to pretend I’m in a quiet room and no one is touching me. But since I have kids, husband and pets, I usually try to veg out with them, doing something requiring no brain power.

Describe your typical work routine.

Sketch a few thumbnails of what I want to do. Decide on one. Realize that idea was shit. Start over with a different thumbnail. Second guess myself. Yell at myself in my head to just go with it. Starting over 12 times is a wee bit overkill. Tell Kira ( youngest daughter) she cannot use the copics or my watercolor paper. Yell at the cat for jumping on my desk. Start painting. Stare at the cat who is now drinking paint water…. (whhhhhhyyyyyyy) push cat off desk. Look for cat hair in the painting. Dig them out. Repeat until painting is complete. Put the painting away because otherwise a kid will draw on it.

What tools do you use to create comics and what makes them the “right tools” for you?

It depends on what I’m feeling for that piece. I use Bombay inks, watercolors, iPad Procreate, copics, acrylic paint, pencils…. some weird amalgamation of all of the above… just depends on the textures and feeling I want in that piece.

What element of your work gives you the most personal satisfaction?

My favorite part of my work is when I work in watercolors or ink, and the colors swirl perfectly. I paint a lot of wet into wet, and I’ll get wildly excited when I see textures coming through or colors blending in an unexpected but wondrous way.

What has been the most rewarding project in your professional career – in or out of comics – and why?

Well this will be silly. But my most rewarding project was making a piece of art for the LexArts public works project. I found out The Nest selected it for use in their building. I cried when I found out, because it’s like my art has come full circle. I started creating as a way to deal with past abuse, and here is my art, now hanging in this place created to help families through the worst of times, including escaping abuse. I can’t begin to explain how meaningful this is to me.

We’ve seen very talented newcomers who are trying to get their first professional projects. What’s the best advice you’ve ever heard given to a promising new creator?

Find your community. Your community will raise each other up, and help each other grow as a person and artist. And if someone says, let me introduce you to this person, let them. 🙂 Making friends and connections is important. 

Let’s get deep: What’s the most important “big idea” that you’ve learned in life – in or out of comics – and why is it important?

Stop comparing yourself to other artists. Everyone has their own style, find yours and run with it. There’s enough room in the world for all of us. (Even you paint cup dump artists.)

Six Bomb Boards: Alex Robinson

Throughout April Octane is celebrating the 10th anniversary of Kentucky’s elite group of comic art creators, the SIX BOMB BOARDS. Get to know them and celebrate with them on Avengers Day at the Six Bomb Boards LiveArt Con at Movie Tavern April 27, 2019 from noon to 8pm.


Your name:
Alex Rhys

Your published credits: 
Bingo Love: Jackpot Edition, Cash & Carrie Book 2, Robin & Cat: Falling In Like With You (self-published)

Where do you live:
Junction City, KY

Your current project(s):
Robin & Cat, my ongoing LGBT romance webcomic.

Website for readers to find out more about you:
robinandcat.com
Twitter: @robinandcat
Instagram: @heypizzaking

When did you first decide that you wanted to create your own comics as a career?

Like just about every artist ever, I’ve been drawing all my life. But it wasn’t until, like…2013? 2014? Around that time that I wanted to create comics for a living. It was around the time I found out who Harvey Pekar was and watched “American Splendor”. I was also big into Daniel Clowes at the time, and I picked up the “Daniel Clowes Reader”. Both of these things, the movie about Pekar’s life and the book discussing Clowes’ work, showed me that a life in comics was possible. That I could tell my own stories and it didn’t have to be about superheroes. And that even if the life isn’t glamorous, it’s fulfilling.

Who has had the biggest influence on you outside the comics industry, and how did they affect your life?

Easy answer is my parents. They never scoffed at me for taking art classes in school, and going into an arts field in college. They even encouraged it. I think they knew I wouldn’t be happy with anything else. The “I really had to think about this” answer is Satoshi Kon, the animation director. He was pushing his field further than anyone else at the time. And when he died, it brought me to tears. There was like this connection, and it made me realize how little time we might have. So draw, write, and create with the days we’ve got.

Who has had the biggest influence on your comics career, and how has that person changed your work?

There are two…no, three people who have helped me tremendously. The first is Johnathon O. Rose-Lyon, who has been a fountain of encouragement and knowledge. He wrote some comics like Neon Noir and Superhuman…they’re really great! The second is Justin Stewart, the master of Six Bomb Boards! Thanks to him, I’ve found my community, and he’s always pushed me to go out there with my ideas. And number three is Shawn Pryor. He has taught me so much about having confidence in what you do, and to go after what you want. He’s my friend, and he believe in my work, so I have to believe, too! I wouldn’t have had the chances I’ve had in the comics industry without him.

What do you do to recharge your creative batteries?

When nothing is going right creatively, then I zone out with a video game. Usually a classic JRPG like a Final Fantasy, or a fun, relaxing game like Kirby or Animal Crossing. But sometimes I have to throw myself into something new to get the creative juices flowing. Like watch a horror movie that would have scared the Baby Alex from 5 years ago. Or read a new manga series because the art looks cool.

Describe your typical work routine.

I have a full-time day job, so the comic work is all done in the evenings and weekends. I post new pages of Robin & Cat on Tuesdays and Thursdays, so each week’s pages have to be done on Monday and Wednesday respectively. Thursday and Friday are veg days after the comic posts. I’ll do either nothing or draw something just for me. Then Saturday and Sunday is writing and drawing time wherever I can fit it in. Usually with plenty of samurai and anime movie breaks.

What tools do you use to create comics and what makes them the “right tools” for you?

I mostly work traditional. Pencil, paper, ink. For my comic, I color digitally, but for everything else I color with copic markers, paint…I’ve been really into white gel pens lately. They add a nice after effect to traditional work. But at the moment, I’ve been experimenting with adding more of the impressionist-esque painting style I do at Live Arts with what I usually do at home with copic markers. I’m having a lot of fun blending it together!

What element of your work gives you the most personal satisfaction?

Trying something new, and it actually working, is the biggest joy I get from my work. Experimenting with style and tools is a lot of fun. But when it comes to my comic, Robin & Cat, it comes from seeing someone totally get what you’re saying. If they felt the emotion I was going for, then I’m doing something right.

What has been the most rewarding project in your professional career – in or out of comics – and why?

It has definitely been Robin & Cat, my webcomic. It just reached it’s 5th birthday of being published online. I’ve never seen anything through this long. And I’ve met so many incredible people from this project! It’s really changed my life.

We’ve seen very talented newcomers who are trying to get their first professional projects. What’s the best advice you’ve ever heard given to a promising new creator?

In the immortal words of Jake the Dog: “sucking at something is the first step towards being sorta good at something.” Just start that thing you’ve wanted to work on! It will probably be bad! But the more practice you put in, the better you get. And find your community. Find people who can help you find what you’re great at, critiques what needs improvement, and lifts you up to doing better.

Let’s get deep: What’s the most important “big idea” that you’ve learned in life – in or out of comics – and why is it important?

Failure isn’t the end. You’re going to fail. A lot. But that’s how you learn and grow. So don’t be afraid to mess up a lot. Because a bad drawing is just a first draft of a good drawing.

Six Bomb Boards Feature: Joshua Penrose

Throughout April Octane is celebrating the 10th anniversary of Kentucky’s elite group of comic art creators, the SIX BOMB BOARDS. Get to know them and celebrate with them on Avengers Day at the Six Bomb Boards Con at Movie Tavern April 27, 2019 from noon to 10pm.


Your name:
Josh Penrose

Your published credits:
None in the comic world, I have diagrams in a science journal out there.

Where do you live:
Lexington, KY

When did you first decide that you wanted to create your own comics as a career? 

I never thought of it as a career.  I did run the comic book club while I was in college and we published some anthology stuff as a collective.  We also participated in some 24 hour challenges.  Recently I have just done some stuff with comics like promo art for a friend but nothing too much like a career.

Who has had the biggest influence on you outside the comics industry, and how did they affect your life?  As far as influence on my life I would have to say my partner Mouse.  She constantly pushes me to keep creating and supports me when I am feeling down on my art.  Not to mention supporting me on my career choice which is not always easy.

Who has had the biggest influence on your comics career, and how has that person changed your work?

As far as artists that influence me I have a couple:Frank Miller:  The art in Sin City really made me want to work in the high contrast style that I am currently exploring.Alan Moore:  His writing and strict devotion to his creations is an inspiration.  To be able to write fiction based on fictional characters being brought together is impressive.  His work has always entertained me and I could reread any of it over and over.Ralph Steadman: My favorite artist of all time.  I grew up loving the Gonzo art and later became completely enthralled with anything he created from children’s books, artwork, political cartoons, to his writing.  He will always be an inspiration to keep working on my style.

What do you do to recharge your creative batteries?

Coffee.  I am a big time coffee drinker.  Even the act of making the coffee has some recharging power for me.

Describe your typical work routine. 

Sitting down in front of my pencils.  Looking confused at my pencils.  Putting ink to the paper.  Messing up that ink.  Not caring that I messed up.  Moving on to the next one.  Inking is my favorite part and I often just go for it no matter how confusing I made my pencils.

What tools do you use to create comics and what makes them the “right tools” for you? 

INK!  I use ink and brush while at home mostly.  When I do events like live art I move to markers.  I found some markers that I really like UNI Posca’s.  I burn through so much ink though that I have gotten used to re-filling them with Montana inks.  Really for me any tool has a purpose and it is just waiting to be found.

What element of your work gives you the most personal satisfaction? 

It’s hard to describe this.  Once a piece is finished there is joy that it is finished but the real satisfaction I think comes from making it.  That being said I don’t like doing pencils so I guess the REAL satisfaction is when I can finally put ink to the paper.

Josh Penrose

What has been the most rewarding project in your professional career – in or out of comics – and why? 

If I were to look at my career in terms of my art I would think that the most rewarding part is when I see people post pictures of my art hanging in their house, or hearing that people were very happy with their gift (my art).

We’ve seen very talented newcomers who are trying to get their first professional projects. What’s the best advice you’ve ever heard given to a promising new creator? 

Keep creating.  It’s hard to stay positive but the real truth is that you need to keep creating.

Let’s get deep: What’s the most important “big idea” that you’ve learned in life – in or out of comics – and why is it important? 

To let the past happen and not keep it in the present.  Learn and move forward, always forward.

That and, always have an out.

Six Bomb Boards Feature: Justin Stewart

Throughout April Octane is celebrating the 10th anniversary of Kentucky’s elite group of comic art creators, the Six Bomb Boards. Get to know them and celebrate with them on Avengers Day at the Six Bomb Boards Con at Movie Tavern April 27, 2019 from noon to 10pm.

Throughout April Octane is celebrating the 10th anniversary of Kentucky’s elite group of comic art creators, the Six Bomb Boards. Get to know them and celebrate with them on Avengers Day at the Six Bomb Boards Con at Movie Tavern April 27, 2019 from noon to 10pm.


Your name:
Justin Stewart

Your published credits:
Bleed Leaders, Kentucky Kaiju, Grrl Scouts: Magic Socks, Avengers Vs X-Men, Howard the Human, Marijuanaman, Miami Vice: Remix

Where do you live:
Nicholasville, KY

Your current project(s) that we should mention:
Currently promoting ‘Bleed Leaders’ which was completed and published in October 2018.

Website for readers to find out more about you:
www.justin3000.com

Justin3000 on Twitter

justin3000stewart on IG

Justin3000 on FB


When did you first decide that you wanted to create your own comics as a career?

When I saw a “How To” article in Wizard magazine in the late 90’s. It went over how to copy and collate your own mini-comic. Coincidentally that article was written and drawn by Jim Mahfood, who was, and still is, my art hero who I’ve collaborated on tons of stuff with.

Who has had the biggest influence on you outside the comics industry, and how did they affect your life?

That’s tough. My initial instinct is to say “my father”, but that’s a whole other thing. So keeping it in entertainment, I’d probably say OutKast? 🙂 The way those dudes came up showed me you can start with whatever you have and make it all the way to wherever it is you want to go. Also, I totally bit the “3000” in my brand from Andre 3000. 😀

Who has had the biggest influence on your comics career, and how has that person changed your work?

Jim Mahfood (aka foodone) without a doubt. He was an art hero of mine before I ever knew him personally and he didn’t disappoint when I did get to know him. He showed me that you can take on the client work, but still do your own thing and still have a thriving career. He taught me that “people will come to you” if you focus on making stuff you enjoy and stuff you want to see out in the world.

What do you do to recharge your creative batteries?

I become completely sedentary and just read and watch movies and shows. You can’t exhale if you don’t inhale, right? 🙂 So when I’m drained creatively, I just accept it and plop down on the couch and watch something I’ve been meaning to or I’ll crack open that book I’ve been chipping away at. And on occasion I’ll have a few beers then go into my basement and dance like I’m on Broadway.

Describe your typical work routine.

I have a part-time day job, so that’s over at noon everyday. Then I’ll go home, eat some lunch, fix some coffee and head to the studio to work until my daughter gets home from school around 3. Then later that night after she and my wife have headed off to bed, I’ll go back to work for an hour or so, mainly just checking over what I did earlier that day. I think it’s super important to push away from the table and let something sit for a while before you send it to the client or consider it “final”.

What tools do you use to create comics and what makes them the “right tools” for you?

Pencil, ink, paint, markers, crayons, chalk, desktop computer, Photoshop, iPad, Procreate; basically whatever I think is gonna work for the thing I wanna do. Sometimes it’s all digital, sometimes all analog, but most of the time it’s a Frankenstein’d combo of both to varying degrees.

What element of your work gives you the most personal satisfaction?

Two things actually: When something comes out onto the paper that’s exactly what I saw in my head and when something happens as I’m working that Bob Ross called “happy accidents”. It’s when you make a mark or stroke that you didn’t intend to make but ultimately makes the art so much better. I like to think that our subconscious knows more than we do, so on occasion it’ll take over and be like, “Nah, you’re overthinking homie. Here, let me take this one.”

What has been the most rewarding project in your professional career – in or out of comics – and why?

That’d be ‘Kentucky Kaiju’. It was a book I concepted and had my three friends and fellow creators, Shawn Pryor, Tressina Bowling, and Jason Sizemore help make a reality. Jason is publisher and EiC of Apex Book Company. He reached out and asked, “You wanna do a comic for me?” I immediately replied, “No. Comics are fuckin hard and take forever. I have an idea about giant monsters tho.” I pitched it, he gave the thumbs up, I hit up Shawn and Tressa and we all made a dope thing! 🙂

We’ve seen very talented newcomers who are trying to get their first professional projects. What’s the best advice you’ve ever heard given to a promising new creator?

“Make friends in the place you wanna be because no one succeeds alone” Connect with people who are on your similar path. They don’t all have to be drawing or painting or doing what you’re doing either. If you’re a painter, hook up with a musician or filmmaker, and vice versa. If you’re being creative and making things, then the commonalities will transcend the particulars. You’ll find common ground with anyone else who’s creating regardless.

Let’s get deep: What’s the most important “big idea” that you’ve learned in life – in or out of comics – and why is it important?

See question 9. 🙂 But I’ll tack onto that; It’s okay to have lulls in your creativity and career. We’re all humans and we all need both downtime and uptime. So don’t beat yourself up if you haven’t posted a new drawing/song/design in a few days. When you have something to say, that’s when you say it. Don’t just make noise.

Octane Announces New Podcast in 2019

In October 2009 Octane began its first year of business which means this year we’ll celebrate 10 years of service. 10 years! I see this as a HUGE victory lap in the evolution of business growth. More than anything (pun intended) I wanted to find a way to share the wisdom and pitfalls Octane endured to new businesses and entrepreneurs making there mark. 

To kick off this NEXT chapter of Octane, I wanted to find a way to celebrate the relationships and the projects over the years as a catalyst to reach out and unify a bigger community of creatives that both love there craft and struggle finding and identifying themselves within community. 

What better way then a podcast?!

But why #morethangraphics? Was this not a giant promo ad for myself? Isn’t that a lil selfish?

My life philosophy evolved into my hashtag #MoreThanGraphics. It’s a realization that regardless of my near robotic pushing out of digital content that I am more than a designer, mom and wife. That in fact I’m a storyteller, a reformed harlot and community unifier that has the ability to change the world everyday.

I know so many others that relate to this, who could use the reminder that they are more than just the sum of there creative output or life achievements.

That’s the internal whisper I wanted the heart of the show to echo to all creatives, but especially to women who need to hear this most.

 

Developing the Idea

But whom to ask to bring for the ride? It became a serious and distant prayer throughout the year until October when this ‘nudge’ hit me again. I began to randomly ask friends to dinner to pick there brain about this ‘podcast idea.’

In this process I wasn’t looking for who was popular and who was the funniest. I was looking for a feeling that encompassed what this show is all about.  

While I did ask others, the feeling was strongest with two amazing ladies who immediately was down for the ride and clicked together in nothing short of a miraculous sign that we were meant to do this together.

 

Brittany Robinson

Meet Brittany 

I’ve known Brittany for years but it wasn’t until recently that we’ve bonded as creatives, leaders and wives.  

When I asked Brittany about what this means to her, her response was literally poetic:

Inclusive innovation and creativity are powerful ways to foster hope and transform communities. This podcast empowers and celebrates our community’s up and coming talents and thought leaders. We aim to create space at the table for women (and men) of all colors, orientations, and backgrounds to honestly discuss, engage, network, and find their tribe. There are so many people doing big, soulful, inspiring work and we can’t wait to amplify their voices.

I’m so excited for the conversations and the guests that she’s been inspired  by to be on the show. Brittany is my guns blazing “iron sharpens iron” woman that really emphasizes exploration of all sides of conversation. 

I love her for it. Go get your own Brittany!

 

Meet Cicely 

Cicely Carter

Cicely was among the women I had dinner with in the planning stages of this podcast. As long time social media friends and journalists (both of us studied journalism in college) we bonded on several things. I love that we’re both moms of kids that are ‘outside the box’ and we both come from a threshold of being a single mom that she still rocks flawlessly while finishing college degrees, modeling and a full time job. Werk.

When I asked her what does it mean for her to be a part of this podcast, she simply said:

The chance to work on this podcast is an opportunity to live out my best bad and bougie life and encourage other women creatives to live the same: in a way that is authentic and appropriate for themselves. I strive to promote the power of living your truth.

What I love most about Cicely is not only how tough she is on the outside but how transparent she is inside that keeps her at a legit 100 which adds so much value to this podcast.

 

And so it begins…

It’s going down LIVE on Facebook January 27 where we’ll share our first live recording of the podcast as teaser for future show subscriptions. 

Each month will feature a different topic and we want to hear from you via IG (@octanedesigns) or Facebook on input and your own stories and truths.

We encourage you to support the podcast via Patreon as a regular listener or a show sponsor. 

To say that I’m excited for this is beyond an understatement. We have planned an amazing line up of guests from across America that are sharing their life truths about taking chances, community and the power of the human spirit. 

Welcome to the MTG podcast, where life is #morethangraphics!

Octane partners with Half-Priced Books for A Hogwarts Party Ultimate Giveaway

Wands at the ready witches and wizards! Octane has partnered with Half Priced Books at both Tiverton and Hamburg locations to bring you the ultimate Hogwarts School of Witchcraft & Wizardry party experience!

Accio Party

Participate in Octane’s Hogwarts Party Ultimate Giveaway! Win the following deluxe party for 8 guests:
  • 8 Hogwarts House Invitations & Matching envelopes- you choose the house
  • 1 ‘Happee Birthdae’ String Banner
  • Set of 6 Floating Candles
  • 1 Faux Stone Hogwarts Great Hall Backdrop with floating House banners and Hogwarts motto
  • 1 Set of 10 Hogwarts Crest Party Straws
  • 1 Oversized Cake Topper (8×10)
  • 3, 8×10 Framed Signs (You Decide What Text You Like)
  • 4 Potion Labeled Bottles
  • 4 Printed Food Label Tent Cards
OVER $150 VALUE! YOURS TO WIN!

Two Ways to Win!

OPTION 1 (Triple Entry Option):

Find the golden snitch hidden at your local @halfpricedbooks (Hamburg Pavilion) (both Tiverton & Hamburg locations)*
*You can only enter once per location.

OPTION 2* (Via Facebook):

*You can only enter once.
GIVEAWAY ENTRY ENDS OCTOBER 15! Truth will out from Octane!

Tiverton location: 127 W Tiverton Way, Lexington KY
Hamburg location: 2321 Sir Barton Way, Lexington KY

 

Franzetti Photography’s Fall Mini Sessions Return!

It is almost time for FALL MINI SESSIONS!

Enjoy updating those family photos or just bring your puppy dog along. Anything goes for mini sessions!

We will hang out at the beautiful Henry Clay Estate for 30 minutes and all your photos will be delivered digitally with a print release.

Christmas tree farm minis coming soon!!

Snag your spot: https://calendly.com/franzett…/fall-mini-sessions/10-27-2018

ACAcakes + Octane at Crave!

We came. We ate. We conquered! Had a great visit to Crave Lexington in support of #ACAcakes sweet tooth booth at Masterson Station Park in Lexington, KY.

 

Branding is Everything

ACAcakes Owner Amanda Edwards had all the right style but needed help executing her plan on short notice of a food festival opportunity. Luckily she knew where to go to knock it quick and professionally!

Her laminated signage by Office Depot was grommeted for easy hanging and her banner printed by PrintLex offered quick turnaround. Design only business cards was a quick solution for her to print as needed before Octane quickly produced signature “sweet staff” t-shirts to complete the full branded concept.

 

    

 

Bring on the sweets

Amanda wanted her signage to pop but also reflect the playful energy she has as a professional cake artist! Her food not only looked good it tasted amazing! Did you try them?

  • Strawberry cupcake – signature strawberry cupcake with cream cheese frosting
  • Cookies & Cream cupcake – classic chocolate cupcakes with cream cheese frosting topped with Oreoes
  • Savory cupcake – cornbread cupcake with cream cheese frosting & popcorn chicken
  • Bad and Bougie chocolate dipped saltines w/ edible gold
  • Cookie dough cups – egg free, ready to eat edible cookie dough (not pictured)

 

      

 

And the rest was…Delish

Of course we couldn’t NOT tour the grounds and explore ALL our tastebuds. Samantha Johnson of @SamanhattanPR didn’t skip a beat and was my grounds co-explorer as we ate all kinds of sweet treats and good eats! The grounds were full of activities for kids, families and adults.

 

Fida’s Caribbean Riblets
Babz Bistro
Thea’s Bass & Biddy Kitchen
Habibi’s Sweets & Pastries
One World Ice Cream

 

All done!

At the end of the day the job was not only complete but filling inside and out!

Interested in having #ACAcakes create beautiful and tasty sweet treats? Visit her online at: www.acacakes.com 

#ACAcakes crew at Crave!